Top 10 Space Images Of 2014

Top 10 Space Images Of 2014

January 1, 2015 | by Danielle Andrew

photo credit: European Space Agency

2014 was an incredible year for space exploration. Here’s a few of the most spectacular space images captured this year.

Colliding Galaxies

Chandra X-ray observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope.

This image, which was released December 11th, shows “ulta luminous X-ray sources”, or ULX’s, exploding from spiral galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2136 as they brush past one another.

The galaxies are about 130 million light-years from earth, found in the constellation Canis Major. The photo is actually a composite image of data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope.

X- ray light is seen as pink, optical light from the Hubble in blue, white, brown and orange, and infrared light from the Spitzer telescope as red.

Mars Rover Selfie

NASA

It turns out even highly advanced robots enjoy a good selfie every now and again! This image was captured by the Mars Rover Hand Lens Imager on April 28th, showing Curiosity cleaning an apparently intriguing rock with its robotic arm mounted Dust Abrasion Tool.

Distant Worlds

NASA/Reuters

This image was taken over many separate exposures from 2003 to 2012 by the Hubble Space Telescope, and was finally released on June 3rd 2014.

Taken using the Hubbles Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camara 3, it shows us the evolving universe and thousands of distant galaxies.

The MOM Mission

ISRO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

One of the top space success stories this year was the ISRO Mars Obiter Mission reaching its destination, sending a flurry of incredible images back to us of the red planet.

Philae the Comet Conquerer

 ESA/ROSETTA/PHILAE/CIVA

Another robot that loves a selfie, this is the unmanned robotic lander Philae on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

For more information on Philae take a look at this article on its landing.

Saturns Violent Polar Storm

NASA

Cassini captured this stunning false colour image of the vortex of Saturns north polar storm this year. The angry red storm clouds are believed to reach up to 330 miles and hour, and the eye is believed to be 1,250 miles across.

The Sun

NASA

This image was taken by Nasa’s Nuclear Spectroscopc Telescope Array, and was its first to be taken of the sun in high-energy X-rays. It was released on Dec 22 2014

The Close Up

JPL/UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA/NASA

So…what is this? It kind of looks like weird animal hide, but what you’re actually looking at is an incredible close up shot of Mars’ surface. This is the Russel Crater dunes, taken by Nasa on Febuary 5th.

Happy Birthday Hubble 

Photograph by NASAESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

This image shoes the Nebula NGC 2174 and was released on March 17th as a happy birthday to the Hubble telescope. It’s found in the Orion constellation, roughly 6,400 light years away in a region called the “stellar nursery”, which is where clouds of dust and gascome together forming young stars.

Hollywood From The Sky 

ISS

This image, courtesy of the International Space Station, captures the bright lights of Hollywood along the coast of the Pacific Ocean.

So there you have it, what we think are the top 10 space photos of 2014.

What are some skills that everyone should have by the time they’re 30 and how can they be mastered?

Answer by Deepak Mehta:

This is a problematic question as it treats the entire population segment above 30 (40-50% of the world population) as one entity.

There are huge differences in people across the world. For people on the lowest rung in the economic spectrum, survival and foraging 2 meals a day would be of utmost importance.

So, let's assume you are talking about the average middle class person with a decent job and a stable income, sufficient educational qualifications and enough resources at his/her disposal to not worry about food, clothing, shelter etc thus having time to focus on other higher order needs.

(Sample set: People over 30; with their psychological needs taken care of)

Skills "everyone" should have:
1. Cooking
Should actually be taught in schools as part of the curriculum. Cooking isn't a job as most people think. Neither is it too hard a skill to acquire. All you need is a few lessons in the basics, knowledge of the important spices, condiments and seasonings used and a good sense of taste and smell.

I have seen people surviving only on restaurant food or fast food when their spouse is away or if their maid is on leave. All they need is to learn how to cook a few basic meals.

Some people complain it is time consuming. It is not. Like any other acquired skill, it will take you longer to make a meal in the beginning, but as you practice more, you can streamline the process and make it more efficient. When I started out, it would take me anywhere between 1-1.25 hours to make a simple meal. Now it takes me less than 20 minutes. I have a rough algorithm to categorize, prioritize and schedule the various activities.

I started out by learning the very basic of cooking an Indian meal – rice, dal, chapattis and a few veggies. Now I have expanded my platter to include non veg preparations (multiple varieties of chicken, mutton, fish, prawns, eggs and bacon), Italian food (pasta, pitabread, , desserts (gulab jamun, porridge, cake, cheesecake etc), breakfast (pancakes, fruit juice etc).

There are a host of websites and apps that are extremely helpful.

2. Driving
One should know the basics of how to drive a 2 wheeler as well as a 4 wheeler. Less expensive than renting a taxi on a vacation. Useful in case of emergencies.

3. Money management
Everything we do is to earn more money. However, with the same amount of money, you can save more and get higher returns if you are judicious.

Know about:

  • Good and safe investments
  • Do not get a credit card
  • Learn about the basics of investing in the stock market (and never get too greedy)
  • The basic tax laws and how you can effectively minimize your tax liability by a mix of investments
  • How to plan your budget and track your income and expenses
  • How to get the best out of a deal (bargains, cheapest prices, eBay etc)

4. Ability to strike up interesting conversations
Conversation-making is probably the most underrated skill. People spend a lot of time travelling and/or waiting. Why not utilize it to talk to the guy/girl next to you? Do it, they won't bite.

What you get out of it?

  • An interesting acquaintance for life (and probably a friend)
  • Stories and insights from a stranger (everyone has one)
  • 30 minutes well spent
  • A good laugh maybe
  • Business connections

As a shy person, I always found it difficult. But one day I decided I would take the plunge and see what happens. That day, I had one of the most interesting conversations with a stranger during the train journey. The other person had tales of his youth (years before I was even born) to tell, a few heart-wrenching personal accounts and some wonderful life advice.

So instead of asking a question, "What life advice would a 60-year old share with 20-year olds?" on Quora, go out and talk to a 60-year old.

5. Basic survival training
Imagine you are in an accident or a crash. Your chances of survival will solely depend on how well you can analyze the situation and use everything at your disposal to help you live and get out.

What you should know?

  • Knowledge of plants and animal – edible, poisonous
  • Knowledge of the major ecological spheres – forests, oceans, deserts, snowy mountains.
  • How to conserve water
  • How to build a shelter
  • How to build some basic weapons
  • A good signalling mechanism
  • How to avoid predators

6. A secondary marketable skill
What if you were an investment banker and suddenly found yourself without a job after the 2007 crisis?

Always have a backup. What else can you do except for trading and valuations? Can you code? Can you design something? Can you write? Can you work as a salesperson?

You should always have a secondary skill you can earn with. You might not be as adept at it, the industry might not be as well paying, but it will still save your skin in times of need.

7. Basic working knowledge of essential tools and technologies
Know how to use a cellphone, a computer, a scanner, how to fix a broken equipment or a stalled car, a wrench, a bow and arrow etc.

Apart from the above, other useful skills could be:

  1. Emergency medical training (CPR etc)
  2. Sign language
  3. Basic grasp on the major languages in the world – English, Spanish, Mandarin, Hindi
  4. Programming
  5. Self defence

I will leave you with a quote from Robert A. Heinlein.

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
-Robert A. Heinlein

What are some skills that everyone should have by the time they're 30 and how can they be mastered?

What are the top ten things I should experience in life?

Answer by Siddharth R Kodwani:

  1. Rent a Luxurious car you cannot afford to buy. Drive it like you own it. Go to some expensive restaurants and enjoy the whole day like you are a millionaire. Next morning, go to some silent place(I would prefer with my girlfriend) and observe the sunrise. You will understand the real worth of your life.
  2. Try being a traveler rather than a tourist. Go some place you always wanted to go. ( Me? Greenland to see Aurora!)
  3. Come out of your comfort zone. Do something you never tried or something you are not good at. Worst scenario, you will fail. But you have a hell of a story to share with people (or impress them).
  4. Achieve a state of mind where you are not afraid of failure. That's like attaining MOKSHA in real life.
  5. To achieve no.4, you need to fail really hard at something and make a come back.
  6. Say YES when everyone said No and prove them you are right. Despite Democracy, you can be a KING (To those who said NO!)
  7. Help a stranger with no intention of favor in return. Generosity earns you a huge amount of Respect.
  8. Gather some courage you need to resign from your job and do what you actually always wanted to do.
  9. Surprise your loved ones once in a while and capture their expressions. That's what purity of emotions look like.
  10. I cannot think of something for number 10 but you can always try to get first 1000's of upvotes on your answer here at Quora. I felt amazing when I experienced it for the first time.

What are the top ten things I should experience in life?

What should every person be knowledgeable about or be proficient in by the age of 20?

Answer by Deepak Mehta:

20 is a milestone age for most. It's the time when you are no longer a teen and not yet a complete adult. You are most likely to still be in college. However, all that will be in constant flux in the next 3-4 years where you have to decide on your career choices, get a job, start earning (and saving), and being independent in the truest sense of the word.

Let's break down the things one need to know when they are 20 into basic survival traits and the 3 major spheres of life – personal, social and professional (I have taken this partly from my post. You can check it out too if you like although it does have things you need not know before 20, but later on) (Links have been underlined):

A. Survival and self-sufficiency

  1. Cooking
    Face it, this should be taught in school. If you can't cook, you are dependent on others – your maid, your spouse, your local restaurants. What if it is late night and you are alone? Where will you be when hunger strikes? (:P). Stop thriving on easy-to-eat food.
    (Get started , Website, Android app)
  2. Budgeting and managing your expenses
  3. Basic survival skills
    Imagine you are in an accident or a crash. Your chances of survival will solely depend on how well you can analyze the situation and use everything at your disposal to help you live and get out.

    What you should know?

    • Knowledge of plants and animal – edible, poisonous
    • Knowledge of the major ecological spheres – forests, oceans, deserts, snowy mountains.
    • How to conserve water
    • How to build a shelter
    • How to build some basic weapons
    • A good signalling mechanism
    • How to avoid predators
      (All the above and more)
  4. Self-defense
    The world can be a nasty place sometime. Know how to protect yourself and your loved ones if ever the need arises. (A good starting point)
    Enroll yourself in a self-defense class. Have some basic training in martial art form. Build up your strength and agility.
  5. Learn how to jump-start a car
  6. How to set up a camp
  7. How to make a fire without matches
  8. Emergency skills

B. Professional career

  1. Know how to build a good resume (Resume tips 1, Resume tips 2, Resume tips 3)
  2. How to apply for jobs and increase your chances of selection (Reading)
  3. How to make a good first impression (Reading)
  4. How to make good connections at work (Reading)
  5. Have a secondary marketable skill
    What if you were an investment banker and suddenly found yourself without a job after the 2007 crisis?

    Always have a backup. What else can you do except for trading and valuations? Can you code? Can you design something? Can you write? Can you work as a salesperson?

    You should always have a secondary skill you can earn with. You might not be as adept at it, the industry might not be as well paying, but it will still save your skin in times of need.

  6. Learn how to manage time and have a healthy work-life balance. (Reading)
  7. Learn coding.
    Nothing can be more helpful in you day-to-day professional life than knowing a bit of computer sorcery. Know how to write the simplest of macros to automate mundane tasks, be efficient, remember all your To-dos. You have a pretty powerful machine at your disposal. Make it work. (Get started)

C. Personal life

A person should be able to live alone – with no external contact or assistance. It's essential to take out time for family and friends, but equally critical to take out time for self.

  1. How to build stuff from scrap and basic household items (The best resource on the internet)
  2. How to stay fit without any equipment (100 no-equipment workouts)
  3. How to stay alone, yet entertained  (74 things to do when you're bored and alone)

D. Social life

You might be an introvert who spends weekends in his living room, reading or surfing through channels. But contrary to point C above, man is after all a "social animal" and must know how to live among others.

  1. Know how to break the ice (Reading)
  2. Know how to strike up and hold an interesting conversation. Sometimes with complete strangers. Probably on topics you know nothing about. (Reading)
  3. Learn to listen. Listening may seem like a passive ability, but it isn't. There's a difference between hearing and listening and that is the level of engagement you have with the speaker. (Reading)
  4. Get people to like you (Reading)
  5. Learn to make cocktails and be the life of the party (Some easy recipes)
  6. Learn to make some easy-to-make snacks for when you are having people over (Some easy recipes)
  7. Public speaking. Join Toastmasters.
  8. Learn card games. May be poker? (Know your poker hands)
  9. Learn sign language (American Sign Language)
  10. Know how to remember people's names and faces. (Reading)
  11. Also, how to make proper introductions. To avoid awkward situations. (Reading)
  12. Or, how to tell a good story (Reading)

E. Misc

  1. ONE BIG ASS CHEAT-SHEET FOR LIFE
  2. A compendium of useful psychological life hacks
  3. How to write fast, well-constructed papers
  4. Never miss your lines while delivering a speech
  5. Kitchen cheat sheets
  6. Dining Etiquette 101

Finally, the mandatory quote:

What should every person be knowledgeable about or be proficient in by the age of 20?

Earth at Night

Breathtaking Big Marble That We Call Home Sweet Home [22 Pics, 2 Vids]

December 8th, 2012

NASA has shown us views of the Big Marble, the breathtakingly beautiful planet on which we live because it studies space and the Earth. The first Big Blue Marble photo was released in 1972 and each subsequent release of images have increased in quality so that the newest 2012 release of the Big Black Marble, or Earth at Night, are stunning. The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite was launched last year by NASA, NOAA, and the Department of Defense. It orbits 512 miles above our planet’s surface and has an extremely sensitive sensor that can detect the nocturnal glow produced by Earth’s atmosphere. In fact, it can see the light given off from a single street light or one glowing light on a boat floating alone on the ocean. The VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) “carries a low-light sensor that can distinguish night lights with six times better spatial resolution and 250 times better resolution of lighting levels (dynamic range) than before.” NASA added, “A global composite image, constructed using cloud-free night images from a new NASA and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite, shows the glow of natural and human-built phenomena across the planet in greater detail than ever before.” So here is the series of the Big Marble in Old, New, Aqua, Blue, White and Black Marble. If you stop to think that this is our home, all of us regardless of where on the globe you are located, then it somehow seems possible that we could achieve peace on Earth around this holiday season for Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and Boxing Day. It also shows why we should protect our environment . . . it belongs to your children’s children and us all. Thank you NASA! You ROCK! [22 Photos, 2 Videos]

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“This image of North and South America at night is a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi NPP satellite in April and October 2012. The new data was mapped over existing Blue Marble imagery of Earth to provide a realistic view of the planet.” NASA added, “The day-night band observed Hurricane Sandy, illuminated by moonlight, making landfall over New Jersey on the evening of Oct. 29. Night images showed the widespread power outages that left millions in darkness in the wake of the storm.” Photo #1 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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The “continental United States at night is a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi NPP satellite in April and October 2012. The image was made possible by the satellite’s “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), which detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, gas flares, auroras, wildfires and reflected moonlight.” Photo #2 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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Black Marble – Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. NASA reported, “Unlike a camera that captures a picture in one exposure, the day-night band produces an image by repeatedly scanning a scene and resolving it as millions of individual pixels. Then, the day-night band reviews the amount of light in each pixel. If it is very bright, a low-gain mode prevents the pixel from oversaturating. If the pixel is very dark, the signal is amplified.” The Earth Observatory wrote of the night lights on our globe, “Scientists are using new images of Earth’s dark side to gain insight on human activity and poorly understood natural events.” Photo #3 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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Black Marble Europe at night 2012. “For all the reasons that we need to see Earth during the day, we also need to see Earth at night,” said Steve Miller, a researcher at NOAA’s Colorado State University Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere. “Unlike humans, the Earth never sleeps.” Photo #4 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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Black Marble – Asia and Australia. On Out of the Blue and Into the Black, Miller is quoted as saying, “The night is nowhere near as dark as most of us think. In fact, the Earth is never really dark. And we don’t have to be in the dark about what is happening at night anymore either.” Photo #5 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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Why is Western Australia So Bright? “Careful observers of the new ‘Black Marble’ images of Earth at night released this week by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have noticed bright areas in the western part of Australia that are largely uninhabited. Why is this area so lit up, many have asked?” The sensor on the satellite is so sensitive that it picked up wild fires at night. Photo #6 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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The image above shows London and the southern half of Great Britain as it appeared on the night of March 27, 2012. NASA Earth Observatory Photo #7 by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using VIIRS Day Night Band and MODIS Blue Marble data

Earth at Night in HD. Video #1 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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USA East Coast lights on Friday, June 29th, 2012. NASA Earth Observatory Photo #8 by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon using data from the NASA/NOAA satellite S-NPP

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Composite map of the world assembled from data acquired by the Suomi NPP satellite in April and October 2012. Photo #9 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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Black Marble – City Lights 2012. NASA’s Earth Observatory said, “Earth at Night 2012: It’s the end of the night as you know it; you’ll see fine.” Photo #10 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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Black Marble 2012, Asia at night. NASA’s Earth Observatory wrote, “Away from human settlements, light still shines. Wildfires and volcanoes rage. Oil and gas wells burn like candles. Auroras dance across the polar skies. Moonlight and starlight reflect off the water, snow, clouds, and deserts. Even the air and ocean sometimes glow.” Photo #11 by NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

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Most Amazing High Definition Image of Earth – Blue Marble 2012. Photo #12 by NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring

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The Blue Marble 2012 turned into a ‘White Marble’ with this snow and ice Arctic View. “Fifteen orbits of the recently launched Suomi NPP satellite provided the VIIRS instrument enough time (and longitude) to gather the pixels for this synthesized view of Earth showing the Arctic, Europe, and Asia.” Photo #13 by NASA/GSFC/Suomi NPP

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NASA Blue (Aqua) Marble 2007 West. Photo #14 by Reto Stöckli, based on data from NASA and NOAA

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NASA Blue (Aqua) Marble 2007 East. Photo #15 by Reto Stöckli, based on data from NASA and NOAA

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NASA’s Spacecraft View of Aurora Australis from Space. NASA file image acquired September 11, 2005. Photo #16 by NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

From space, the aurora is a crown of light that circles each of Earth’s poles. The satellite captured this view of the aurora australis (southern lights) on September 11, 2005, four days after a record-setting solar flare sent plasma—an ionized gas of protons and electrons—flying towards the Earth. The ring of light that the solar storm generated over Antarctica glows green in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum, shown in this image. The observations of the aurora are overlaid onto NASA’s satellite-based Blue Marble image. From the Earth’s surface, the ring would appear as a curtain of light shimmering across the night sky. Video #2 by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio via LittleSDOHMI

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Blue Marble – 2002. Photo #17 by NASA Earth Observatory

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Blue Marble 2002: At the time, “This spectacular ‘blue marble’ image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date.” Photo #18 by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Image by Reto Stöckli (land surface, shallow water, clouds). Enhancements by Robert Simmon (ocean color, compositing, 3D globes, animation). Data and technical support: MODIS Land Group; MODIS Science Data Support Team; MODIS Atmosphere Group; MODIS Ocean Group Additional data: USGS EROS Data Center (topography); USGS Terrestrial Remote Sensing Flagstaff Field Center (Antarctica); Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (city lights

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Blue Marble 2000. Photo #19 created by Reto Stockli with the help of Alan Nelson, under the leadership of Fritz Hasler

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Earth image and star field background, released in 2000. Photo #20 by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio / The Blue Marble data is courtesy of Reto Stockli (NASA/GSFC) / Laura Rocchio (NASA/GSFC)

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First Blue Marble image captured from Apollo 17 on Dec 7, 1972. “View of the Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew traveling toward the moon. This translunar coast photograph extends from the Mediterranean Sea area to the Antarctica south polar ice cap. This is the first time the Apollo trajectory made it possible to photograph the south polar ice cap. Note the heavy cloud cover in the Southern Hemisphere. Almost the entire coastline of Africa is clearly visible. The Arabian Peninsula can be seen at the northeastern edge of Africa. The large island off the coast of Africa is the Malagasy Republic. The Asian mainland is on the horizon toward the northeast. Astronaut photograph AS17-148-22727 courtesy NASA Johnson Space Center Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.” Photo #21 by NASA

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What is your favorite…Old, New, Aqua, Blue, White or Black Marble? Blue Marble – Astronaut photograph 1972; Blue Marble 2002; Aqua Marble 2005; Bottom row left to right: Blue Marble 2012; White Marble 2012; Black Marble 2012. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center wrote, “Since we have escaped the bounds of gravity, visions of Earth have inspired and captured the imagination. Here are a few of the most iconic views of our planet returned by both living astronauts and robotic spacecraft in orbit throughout the space age.” Photo #22 by Apollo 1972 / NASA / NASA Earth Observatory